UTP Blog

Advancing Knowledge

Canadian Federalism: Performing amidst the Pandemic

Canadian Federalism is Canada’s leading text on federal institutions and processes. With the fourth edition due out this month, we asked editors Herman Bakvis and Grace Skogstad to look at the potential effects COVID-19 will have on Canadian federalism, as well as what to expect from the fourth edition.

Canada Day Reading: Learn More about Canadian History

It’s Canada Day this week and although things might be a little different this year, we still hope you have the opportunity to spend time with loved ones and celebrate all things Canada. And what better way to celebrate than by learning more about this great country. We have a fantastic selection of books on Canadian History that you can to your reading list. Scroll down to learn more.

Pride Month: Celebrating a Year of Viva M·A·C with Andrea Benoit

In our final post for Pride Month, we spoke with Andrea Benoit, author of VIVA M·A·C: AIDS, Fashion, and the Philanthropic Practices of M·A·C Cosmetics, a book that is celebrating its one year release. We asked Andrea about the M·A·C Cosmetics story and also what Pride might look like this year. We even got it all on video. Enjoy!

Pride Month: Reimagining Queer Protest in Singapore

It’s Pride Month, and to celebrate we’re reaching out to some of our UTP authors and asking them them to delve deeper into their books as well as share what Pride might look like this year. In this post, Robert Phillips, author of Virtual Activism: Sexuality, the Internet, and a Social Movement in Singapore, discusses the history of the LGBT movement, and in particular, examines how the movement has unfolded in Singapore over the last twenty years.

Decades Later, Women in Academia Continue Lifting a Ton of Feathers

Lifting a Ton of Feathers: A Woman’s Guide to Surviving in the Academic World was published in 1993. It was originally intended not only as a survival guide, but as a way to help destroy some of the myths surrounding women’s career opportunities in the university. In this post, author Paula J. Caplan revists her book and explains why nearly 30 years on, many of the struggles women face in academia remain unchanged.