UTP Blog

Advancing Knowledge

Science & Technology

Science Writing in a Time of Crisis

It’s day four of University Press Week and today the blog tour is highlighting the scientific voices within the community. One of those voices is Mireille F. Ghoussoub, who holds a PhD in materials chemistry from the University of Toronto and is the co-author of The Story of CO2: Big Ideas for a Small Molecule. In this post, Mireille highlights why, in a world facing climate change and a global pandemic, the need for honest and effective science communication has never been greater.

Beyond Binaries: Chemical Technologies for Coping with Climate Change

The Story of CO2, due for release on November 5, is the latest book from Aevo UTP to contribute to the vital conversation on climate change. The book highlights the cutting-edge science and emerging technologies that can transform carbon dioxide into a myriad of products such as feedstock chemicals, polymers, pharmaceuticals, and fuels. In this post, authors Geoffrey A. Ozin and Mireille F. Ghoussoub discuss the book in more detail and why we should be considering CO2 as a resource in the fight against catastrophic climate change. 

Re-Envisioning Cell Theory (Part 3): Sublime Slime Molds

It’s the last part of our latest blog series written by Sherrie L. Lyons, author of From Cells to Organisms. The book delves into the nature of scientific practice, showing that results are interpreted not only through the lens of a microscope, but also through the lens of particular ideas and prior philosophical convictions. In this final part, Lyons discusses the fascinating world of slime molds, the unlikely superhero within the ecosystem.

Re-Envisioning Cell Theory (Part 2)

Now available for courses, From Cells to Organisms delves into the nature of scientific practice, showing that results are interpreted not only through the lens of a microscope, but also through the lens of particular ideas and prior philosophical convictions. In this three-part blog series, author Sherrie L. Lyons will discuss her book and delve deeper into the history of cell theory. In part two, Lyons looks at the current pandemic and explains why the majority of viruses and microbes are not only not harmful, they are essential to our health.

Re-Envisioning Cell Theory (Part 1)

Now available for courses, From Cells to Organisms delves into the nature of scientific practice, showing that results are interpreted not only through the lens of a microscope, but also through the lens of particular ideas and prior philosophical convictions. In a new three-part blog series, author Sherrie L. Lyons will discuss her book and delve into the history of cell theory. In part one, she examines the question: “What makes something alive?”