UTP Blog

Advancing Knowledge

American Anthropological Association 2020 Author Events

This year’s AAA meeting will be held virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic and anthropologists will be raising our voices and taking part in a number of online live-streamed events. Check out the schedule where a number of UTP authors will be taking part.

Twenty Years of Digital Politics in Canada

Ideal for a wide-ranging course on the impact of digital technology on the Canadian political system, newly released Digital Politics in Canada: Promises and Realities encourages students to critically engage in discussions about the future of Canadian politics and democracy. In this post, editors Tamara A. Small and Harold J. Jansen discuss their love of digital politics and examine some of the changes that have taken place in Canadian politics over the last twenty years. 

The Rapids: Ways of Looking at Mania (Part 3)

In a new blog series to highlight the ways in which mental health is depicted and discussed in today’s world, Sam Twyford-Moore, author of The Rapids, talks with other writers about some of their own experiences relating to mental health. In this final part, Sam talks to fellow Australian author David Stavanger.

Beyond Binaries: Chemical Technologies for Coping with Climate Change

The Story of CO2, due for release on November 5, is the latest book from Aevo UTP to contribute to the vital conversation on climate change. The book highlights the cutting-edge science and emerging technologies that can transform carbon dioxide into a myriad of products such as feedstock chemicals, polymers, pharmaceuticals, and fuels. In this post, authors Geoffrey A. Ozin and Mireille F. Ghoussoub discuss the book in more detail and why we should be considering CO2 as a resource in the fight against catastrophic climate change. 

Order and Disorder: England’s Troubled History

Award-winning teacher Ken MacMillan is the author of the recently published Death and Disorder: A History of Early Modern England, 1485–1690. The book introduces readers to the tumultuous world of Tudor and Stuart England, where numerous kings and queens were killed, their advisors assassinated, treasonous nobles beheaded, religious heretics burned at the stake, and common criminals executed by hanging. In this post, MacMillan delves deeper into some of these stories and discusses what we can expect from the book.