UTP Blog

Advancing Knowledge

Re-Envisioning Cell Theory (Part 1)

Now available for courses, From Cells to Organisms delves into the nature of scientific practice, showing that results are interpreted not only through the lens of a microscope, but also through the lens of particular ideas and prior philosophical convictions. In a new three-part blog series, author Sherrie L. Lyons will discuss her book and delve into the history of cell theory. In part one, she examines the question: “What makes something alive?”

Having the Difficult Discussions about Race and Ethnicity in the Classroom

In a new post, Laura Tubelle de González, author of Through the Lens of Cultural Anthropology, discusses the conversations that are now taking place in academia to support the Black Lives Matter movement. In conjunction, we have made available a free chapter from her cultural anthropology textbook on Race and Ethnicity which we hope will bring a wider audience to the material and continue the much-needed conversations on the matter.

Behind the Book: Exploring Illustrated Children’s Literature under Lenin and Stalin

Released this summer, Picturing the Page: Illustrated Children’s Literature and Reading under Lenin and Stalin offers a vivid exploration of illustrated children’s literature and reading under Lenin and Stalin – a period when mass publishing for children and universal public education became available for the first time in Russia. In this post, author Megan Swift talks about how her book came to life and explores the vital and multifaceted function illustrated children’s literature plays in repurposing the past.

An Excerpt from Black Racialization and Resistance at an Elite University

The presence and experiences of Black people at elite universities have been largely underrepresented and erased from institutional histories. Black Racialization and Resistance at an Elite University by rosalind hampton engages with a collection of these experiences that span half a century and reflect differences in class, gender, and national identifications among Black scholars. In this post, we share an excerpt from Chapter 4 of the book: “The Idealized Elite University.”