Tag Archives: Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

UTP Goes to Congress: Enter Our Twitter Contest!

Our team is on its way to the beautiful University of British Columbia for Congress! Heading to BC? Plan to drop by the UTP display to meet with editors, grab some swag, and enter our contests – and, of course, add a book or two to your reading list.

First up: we’ll be kicking off the week with a Twitter contest. It’s easy: during Congress, follow us @utpress and send out a tweet using the hashtag #UTPGoesToCongress. You’ll be entered to win a prize pack of our top titles in higher ed. Hanging out at Congress and aren’t on Twitter? Stop by the UTP booth and sign up for our newsletter for another chance to win. Never miss an update and you may have some great reads heading your way…

Learn more about our higher ed prize pack:

Work Your Career: Get What You Want from Your Social Sciences or Humanities PhD

How do you choose between a non-academic and an academic career? Prepare for both from your first day on campus! Authors Jonathan Malloy and Loleen Berdahl show how your PhD can take you down any number of paths. Filled with practical, no-nonsense advice tailored to you, you’ll want this handy guide beside you every step of the way.


The Craft of University Teaching

How does university instruction look when it’s approached as a craft? In an era of bureaucratic oversight, diminishing budgets, and technological distraction, Peter Lindsay seeks to reclaim teaching as the rewarding endeavor it is.

 


The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy

A must-read for anyone in academia concerned about the frantic pace of contemporary university life. Focusing on individual faculty members and their own professional practice, Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber present both an analysis of the culture of speed in the academy and ways of alleviating stress while improving teaching, research, and collegiality.


Course Correction: A Map for the Distracted University

The university’s business, Paul Gooch writes, is to generate and critique knowledge claims, and to transmit and certify the acquisition of knowledge. Course Correction engages in deliberation about what the twenty-first-century university needs to do in order to re-find its focus as a protected place for unfettered commitment to knowledge, not just as a space for creating employment or economic prosperity.


Kickstarting Your Academic Career: Skills to Succeed in the Social Sciences

An essential primer on the common scholastic demands that social sciences students face upon entering college or university. Based on the challenges that instructors most often find students need help with, Robert Ostergard Jr. and Stacy Fisher offer practical advice and tips on topics such as how to communicate with instructors, take notes, read a textbook, research and write papers, and write successful exams.

 


Contest Rules and Regulations – University of Toronto Press
Open to residents of Canada (excluding the Province of Quebec)

1. CONTEST PERIOD: The 2019 University of Toronto Press Twitter contest commences at 12:00 AM Eastern Time (“ET”) on June 1, 2019, and will end at June 8, 2019 (the “Contest Period”). All times are Eastern Times.

2. RULES: By entering this Contest, entrants agree to abide by these Contest rules and regulations (the “Official Rules”). The decisions of the independent contest organization with respect to all aspects of the Contest are final. These rules are posted at http://blog.utorontopress.com/2019/05/30/utp-congress-twitter-contest

3. ELIGIBILITY: To enter the win the Contest and be eligible to win a Prize (see rule 6), a person (“Entrant”) must, at the time of entry, be a legal resident of Canada (excluding the Province of Quebec) who has reached the age of majority in his/her province or territory of residence. The following individuals and members of such person’s immediate family (including mother, father, brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, partner or spouse regardless of where they live) or persons with whom they are domiciled (whether related to the person or not) are not eligible to enter the Contest: employees, officers, directors, shareholders, owners, general and limited partners, agents, representatives, successors.

4. HOW TO ENTER: During the Contest period, follow @utpress on Twitter, and tweet using the hashtag #UTPGoesToCongress that pertains to the Contest. Limit one (1) entry per person per day during the contest Period regardless of method of entry. Any person who is found to have entered in a fashion not sanctioned by these Official Rules will be disqualified.

5. PRIZE: The winner will receive one (1) print copy of each of the following: Course Correction, The Slow Professor, Work Your Career, Kickstarting Your Academic Career, and The Craft of University Teaching.

6. DRAW:

i. The random draw will include all eligible entries, and will take place on June 9, 2019 at 12:00 PM at the University of Toronto Press offices, located at 800 Bay St. Mezzanine, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3A9.

ii. The winner will be contacted via social media, and will be included in the announcement on Twitter. If a selected Entrant cannot be reached via social media within 7 days of the draw, then he/she will be disqualified and another Entrant will be randomly selected until such time as contact is made via social media with a selected Entrant that satisfies the foregoing requirements or there are no more eligible entries, whichever comes first. University of Toronto Press will not be responsible for failed attempts to contact a selected Entrant.

7. CONDITIONS OF ENTRY: By entering the Contest, Entrants (i) confirm compliance with these Official Rules including all eligibility requirements, and (ii) agree to be bound by these Official Rules and by the decisions of University of Toronto Press, made in its sole discretion, which shall be final and binding in all matters relating to this Contest. Entrants who have not complied with these Official Rules are subject to disqualification.

8. CONSENT TO USE PERSONAL INFORMATION: University of Toronto Press respects your right to privacy. The information you provided will only be used for the purpose of administering this Contest and prize fulfillment. For more information regarding University of Toronto Press’s privacy statement, please visit https://utorontopress.com/ca/privacy-policy.

UTP Goes to Congress 2019

With summer fast approaching, that can only mean one thing here at UTP. Yes, we’re packing our bags and heading to Congress 2019 in gorgeous Vancouver, BC. We will be mounting our largest ever display of books in Vancouver, and we’ll be teaming up with our Journals and Distribution divisions to showcase an even wider range of publications.

Whether you are attending your association’s conference or are a member of the Vancouver community, we would love to see you. Don’t miss this opportunity to develop your social network, or maybe add some fabulous UTP books to your home or office library. You can find us at the Congress Expo, located in the Congress Hub. You can also follow us on Twitter throughout the conference for regular updates.

In this blog post, we’ve listed a number of key events throughout the week of Congress that you should mark in your calendars. We hope to see you in Vancouver!


Key Events at Congress

Sunday, June 2, 2019: 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM (AMS Nest – NEST 2301 Expo Event Space)

Book Launch: Amplify

Join us for the book launch of Amplify, where author Norah Bowman will discuss this latest addition in graphic storytelling.

In this highly original text – a collaboration between a college professor, a playwright, and an artist – graphic storytelling offers a unique way for readers to understand and engage with feminism and resistance in a more emotionally resonant way.


Sunday, June 2, 2019: 12:00 PM-1:00 PM (Laserre 102)

CAS Book Celebration

Come and learn about the books that have been published in 2018-19 and meet their authors. Some copies will be available for purchase and/or author signing. Natalie Kononenko will be in attendance to launch her new book Ukrainian Epic and Historical Song, and Erica L. Fraser will be there to celebrate her book Military Masculinity and Postwar Recovery in the Soviet Union.


Monday, June 3, 2019: 5:30 PM – 8:00 PM (Ideas Lounge and Patio)

Reception of the Canadian Committee on Women’s History

Featuring Reading Canadian Women’s and Gender Historyedited by Nancy Janovicek and Carmen Nielson.

Inspired by the question of “what’s next?” in the field of Canadian women’s and gender history, this broadly historiographical volume represents a conversation among established and emerging scholars who share a commitment to understanding the past from intersectional feminist perspectives.


Monday, June 3, 2019: 6:00 PM – 8:25 PM (Wise Hall, 1882 Adanac Street, Vancouver, BC, V5L 2E2)

Marvellous Grounds: Queering Urban Justice

A discussion with the editors of the Marvellous Grounds Collective on queering urban justice and challenging racialized state formations and geographies.

Speakers:
  • Ghaida Moussa, PHD Student York University, PhD Student York University
  • Jin Haritaworn, Professor, York University, Professor, York University
  • Syrus Marcus Ware, PhD Student York University

Tuesday, June 4, 2019: 1:30 PM – 3:00 PM

Book Launch for A Violent History of Benevolence

Following on from the Queer Caucus meeting at noon, The Canadian Association for Social Work Education will be hosting the launch for A Violent History of Benevolence by Chris Chapman and A.J. Withers.

The book traces how normative histories of liberalism, progress, and social work enact and obscure systemic violences.


Tuesday, June 4, 2019: 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM (Dorothy Somerset Studio – Room 101)

Coffee Break and Book Launch: Insecurity

The Canadian Association for Theatre Research will be hosting a book launch for Dr. Jenn Stephenson’s new book Insecurity: Perils and Products of Theatres of the Real.

“This book offers a compelling and timely investigation of the ‘real’, ably and amply illustrated by a diversity of case studies. A must-read addition to scholarship on Canadian theatre and performance.”

Susan Bennett, Department of English, University of Calgary


Wednesday, June 5, 2019: 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM (Buchanan Tower 1197)

Book Launch for Violence, Order, and Unrest

The Canadian Historical Association will be hosting a book launch for Violence, Order, and Unrest edited by Elizabeth Mancke, Jerry Bannister, Denis McKim, and Scott W. See.

This edited collection offers a broad reinterpretation of the origins of Canada. Drawing on cutting-edge research in a number of fields, Violence, Order, and Unrest explores the development of British North America from the mid-eighteenth century through the aftermath of Confederation.


Wednesday, June 5, 2019: 1:30 PM – 3:00 PM (AMS Nest – NEST 2301 Expo Event Space)

Peter Lindsay on The Craft of University Teaching

What does university teaching – as a craft – look like? What changes does a craft perspective suggest for higher education? These questions will be addressed in both a general sense – What does the act of teaching become when treated as a craft? What changes to a professor’s educational philosophy does it require? – and with respect to the practical, everyday tasks of university professors, such as the use and misuse of technology, the handling of academic dishonesty, the assignment of course reading, and the instilling of enthusiasm for learning. Join author Peter Lindsay as he addresses these questions, outlined in his book, The Craft of University Teaching.


Thursday, June 6, 2019: 3:30 PM – 5:00 PM (AMS Nest – NEST 2306)

Work Your Career: How to Strategically Position Yourself for Career Success

How can prospective and recent PhD students best position themselves for rewarding careers? Do you have to choose between preparing for an academic or non-academic career path? Drawing on research and their personal career histories in the nonprofit, government and academic sectors, the speakers will outline tools to: identify current career competencies and networks; create an action plan to increase competitiveness for both academic and non-academic careers simultaneously; and articulate competencies to potential employers. Current and recent PhD students, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate supervisors and chairs in the social sciences and humanities should plan to attend.

Speakers:
  • Loleen Berdahl, Professor and Head, Department of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan
  • Jonathan Malloy, Professor, Department of Political Science, Carleton University

Thursday, June 6, 2019: 6:00 Pm – 8:00 PM (Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre – IRSHDC Main Room)

Genocide, Residential Schools, and the Challenge of [Re]Conciliation: Dialogue and Panel Discussion

Join in a panel discussion and dialogue with Professor David MacDonald (Guelph University) and Dr. Sheryl Lightfoot (University of British Columbia). as they discuss MacDonald’s new book, The Sleeping Giant Awakes: Genocide, Indian Residential Schools and the Challenge of Conciliation.

Speakers:
  • David MacDonald, Guelph University
  • Dr. Sheryl Lightfoot, UBC

The Story Behind Work Your Career: Get What You Want from Your Social Sciences or Humanities PhD

In the lead-up to this year’s Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, where authors Loleen Berdahl and Jonathan Malloy will be leading a Career Corner for graduate students, we are pleased to present some background information on their new book, Work Your Career: Get What You Want from Your Social Sciences or Humanities PhD. Pick up your copy at Congress or order it online today!

Jonathan Malloy, Professor and Chair, Political Science, Carleton University

The issue of career paths for PhD students has received increasing attention in recent years. As someone who has been engaged on this topic since the 1990s, I am excited to see this conversation moving forward and to add my voice to them with a new book, Work Your Career: Get What You Want from Your Social Sciences or Humanities PhD (University of Toronto Press, 2018). In this short and accessible volume, my co-author Loleen Berdahl and I offer practical advice to on how to navigate a social sciences or humanities doctoral program in Canada to lead to career success. It is both about doing a PhD and what to do with a PhD—and thinking about both from the start. One of the things that makes our book distinct is that we strongly advocate a seamless approach to PhD career development that does not require having to decide between “academic” and “non-academic” tracks.

We developed this approach based on our own personal experiences. While we only met in 2014, both of us pursued PhDs in the 1990s being open to the idea of non-academic careers and taking a proactive approach to publishing, networking, and overall career development. After finishing her PhD, Loleen worked outside academia in a public policy role, a career path she greatly enjoyed. For my part, as a PhD student I worked in government briefly and began to write materials for doctoral student audiences, authoring a guide for incoming students in my program and an essay for The Bulletin (the now-defunct official University of Toronto newspaper) on the need for more work and attention to non-academic jobs for PhDs.

I ended up in a position as a faculty member in a department with a large PhD program. Every year, I saw new waves of PhD students constantly struggling with the same issues over and over—not just about academic careers, but every aspect of their programs. I also realized that the mentality I had developed back in my own PhD years gave me a broad perspective and a lot of tacit and relevant knowledge that could be passed on. A particular moment for sharing this knowledge was in 2010, when “rumour blogs” became popular among many PhD students and junior academics, including some devoted specifically to Canadian political science (my discipline). These unmoderated bulletin boards responded to the genuine need and desire for career information and guidance in the sprawling and often opaque world of academia, but were ugly and disreputable—aggressive, often sexist, and defamatory. I decided to counteract this by creating my own blog, “Advice and Discussion about Canadian Polisci Jobs,” and for a year made weekly posts of career advice for Canadian political science PhD students and junior academics. The blog was well-visited and attracted commentary and discussion. I eventually ran out of fresh things to say every week, but the blog stayed up for years and continued to attract visitors.

Loleen was mostly out of the academic world for ten years and while her work connected her to other PhDs working in a variety of non-academic environments, she was not actively engaged in doctoral career mentorship issues. But she later returned to academia with her position at the University of Saskatchewan, and in 2014 we were both elected to the board of the Canadian Political Science Association (CPSA) and met for the first time. After discovering our shared mentality and approach to PhD education and job opportunities, I sent Loleen a link to the blog. Loleen has a strong applied background in knowledge mobilization, and saw the potential for the blog to be expanded and updated to help promote much-needed discussion on the issue. She suggested it could be the foundation of a book, an option I had not previously considered. The idea for Work Your Career came together easily at that point, and Mat Buntin at University of Toronto Press was instantly receptive and supportive.

Our engagement on this topic goes beyond the book to include research and outreach initiatives on career mentoring and development. Of particular note are our conference workshops for PhD students and recent graduates, doctoral supervisors, and interested faculty. After two decades of thinking about PhD education and academic mentoring, I find it encouraging to see a growing number of students and faculty looking at opportunities for doctoral students to prepare for multiple career paths. We will be discussing these ideas further at our Career Corner session at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences on Wednesday, May 30, and welcome all Congress participants interested in PhD careers to attend.

Doctoral students, individual faculty, academic disciplines, and universities are paying growing attention to the career training and futures of Canada’s social sciences and humanities PhD students and graduates. I am happy to have Work Your Career: Get What You Want from Your Social Sciences or Humanities PhD as part of the larger discussion.

Jonathan Malloy is Professor at Carleton University.

May Round-Up

Here is a recap of what went on at UTP in the month of May.

Conferences:

Richard Ratzlaff attended the Association for the Study of Nationalities 2017 Annual World Convention in New York from May 4th to May 6th.

Suzanne Rancourt, Natalie Fingerhut, and Anna Del Col had a great time as always at Kalamazoo (or, the International Congress on Medieval Studies) from May 11th to May 14th.

Finally, we were thrilled to be at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences again this year, from May 27th to June 2nd, and loved that it was in Toronto hosted by Ryerson University. It was great to see so many people interested in our books, and to see so many of our authors and future authors. We are looking forward to Regina next year!

Author Events:

On May 9th, a standing room only crowd gathered at Clinton St Public School for the launch of Making a Global City: How one Toronto School Embraced Diversity by Rob Vipond.  A more intimate, but no less enthusiastic crowd attended a book launch at The Munk Centre for Global Affairs on May 25th.

Awards:

We are thrilled to announce the following awards:

John Borrows’ Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism won the Donald Smiley Prize awarded by the Canadian Political Science Association.

Ronald Rudin’s Kouchibouguac: Removal, Resistance, and Remembrance at a Canadian National Park won both the Clio Atlantic Region Prize and the Canadian Oral History Association Prize, from the Canadian Historical Association.

Maureen Lux’s Separate Beds: A History of Indian Hospitals in Canada, 1920s-1980s won the Aboriginal History Book Prize awarded by the Canadian Historical Association.

Norman Hillmer’s O.D. Skelton: A Portrait of Canadian Ambition won the 2015 Stacey Prize awarded by the Canadian Commission for Military History and the Canadian Committee for the History of the Second World War.

George O. Liber’s Total Wars and the Making of Modern Ukraine, 1914-1954 co-won the Best Book in the fields of Ukrainian history, politics, language, literature, and culture awarded by the American Association for Ukrainian Studies and Maxim Tarnawsky’s The All-Encompassing Eye of Ukraine: Van Nechui-Levyts’kyi’s Realist Prose was an honourable mention in the same prize.

Maria Luisa Ardizzone’s Reading as the Angels Read: Speculation and Politics in Dante’s Banquet won the Medieval Book Prize awarded by the American Association for Italian Studies.

Amber Dean’s Remembering Vancouver’s Disappeared Women: Settler Colonialism and the Difficulty of Inheritance was a co-winner of the Women’s and Gender Studies Association Outstanding Scholarship Prize.

Jennifer Hubbard, David Wildish, and Robert Stephenson’s A Century of Maritime Science: The St. Andrews Biological Station won the John Lyman Book Award awarded by the North American Society for Oceanic History, in the “Naval and Maritime Science and Technology” category.

Karen Foster’s Productivity and Prosperity: A Historical Sociology of Productivist Thought was an honourable mention in the John Porter Prize awarded by the Canadian Sociological Association.

Congratulations to all!

In the Media:

Blacklocks Reporter reviewed Spying on Canadians: The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Security Service and the Origins of the Long Cold War by Gregory S. Kealey.

The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy by Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber was profiled by Frontiers in Psychology.

BizEd Magazine reviewed Rick Nason’s It’s not Complicated: The Art and Science of Complexity in Business.

MidWest Book Review declared Gentrifier by John Schlichtman, Jason Patch and Marc Lamont Hill to be a “must-read” and said it was “highly recommended.”  Schlichtman was interviewed about the book by NPR Wisconsin. 

Rob Vipond was interviewed about Making a Global City: How one Toronto School Embraced Diversity by Steve Paikin, host of TVOntario’s The Agenda.

Lions or Jellyfish: Newfoundland-Ottawa Relations Since 1957 by Raymond Blake was reviewed in a collection of key titles for Canada 150 by Margaret Conrad for Atlantic Books Today.

New Releases:

An Introduction to the Crusades by S.J. Allen

The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy by Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber (New in Paperback!)

Conflict and Compromise: Pre-Confederation Canada by Raymond B. Blake, Jeffrey Keshen, Norman J. Knowles, and Barbara J. Messamore

Conflict and Compromise: Post-Confederation Canada by Raymond B. Blake, Jeffrey Keshen, Norman J. Knowles, and Barbara J. Messamore

Latin American Politics: An Introduction, Second Edition by David Close

Asian Canadian Studies Reader edited by Roland Sintos Coloma and Gordon Pon

Edging Toward Iberia by Jean Dangler

Beau Monde on Empire’s Edge: State and Stage in Soviet Ukraine by Mayhill C. Fowler

Canada’s Department of External Affairs, Volume 3: Innovation and Adaptation, 1968–1984 by John Hilliker, Mary Halloran, and Greg Donaghy

Revitalizing Health for all: Case Studies of the Struggle for Comprehensive Primary Health Care edited by Ronald Labonté, David Sanders, Corinne Packer, and Nikki Schaay

Homelands and Empires: Indigenous Spaces, Imperial Fictions, and Competition for Territory in Northeastern North America, 1690–1763 by Jeffers Lennox

The Art of Subtraction: Digital Adaptation and the Object Image by Bruno Lessard

It’s not Complicated: The Art and Science of Complexity in Business by Rick Nason

Confessional Cinema: Religion, Film, and Modernity in Spain’s Development Years, 1960–1975 by Jorge Pérez

Josep Pla: Seeing the World in the Form of Articles by Joan Ramon Resina

A Nobel Affair: The Correspondence Between Alfred Nobel and Sofie Hess edited and translated by Erika Rummel

Victimology: A Canadian Perspective by Jo-Anne M. Wemmers

Value Change in the Supreme Court of Canada by Matthew E. Wetstein and C.L. Ostberg

The Near Abroad: Socialist Eastern Europe and Soviet Patriotism in Ukraine, 1956-1985 by Zbigniew Wojnowski

Conflict and Compromise

At this year’s Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities in Toronto, we will officially launch our new two-volume narrative overview of Canadian history: Conflict and Compromise: Pre-Confederation Canada and Conflict and Compromise: Post-Confederation Canada by Raymond B. Blake, Jeffrey A. Keshen, Norman J. Knowles, and Barbara J. Messamore. In this blog entry, the authors discuss their focus on cleavages as well as compromises, and the importance of understanding our nation’s history. Visit us at Ryerson during Congress to receive your examination copies (along with some sweet little gifts) or email us with information about your Canadian history survey course and we will make sure examination copies are shipped to you.

Conflict and Compromise: Pre-Confederation CanadaAs Canadians commemorate the 150th anniversary of Confederation, they are often asked to rethink the study of Canada’s past. We couldn’t agree more. Good history helps people know and understand the world in which they live and we believe that Conflict and Compromise, a two-volume history of Canada, will help students make sense of their own past. History is a continual process of understanding change and the challenges that we face as a society. We know it reflects the needs and ideas of the moment, and the predilections, prejudices, and ambitions of the generation writing it.

Conflict and Compromise: Post-Confederation Canada

We believe that every period of Canadian history has been marked by cleavages and conflict—among Indigenous peoples, between Indigenous peoples and newcomers, between French and English, elites and rebels, workers and employers, rural and urban domains, immigrants and host society, and region and centre. Cleavages and conflicts have also been evident over ever-changing attitudes about women’s rights, fundamental economic trends, and culture and values. While those cleavages constantly challenge the idea of a single unified nation, Canadian history has also been marked by a process of negotiation and compromise that has enabled Canada to develop into one of the most successful, pluralistic countries in the world. Within that framework of cleavage and conflict, there have been winners and losers and less-than-contented compromisers. Some in Canada have not embraced difference and diversity, but rather used them to demonize the “other,” sometimes as a political lever; at various times, the country has drifted from negotiation and compromise towards a pattern of wedge politics.

Notions of conflict and compromise permeate these books. We believe they provide a basis for discussion and, we anticipate, vigorous debate. Our aim is to tell a story, and to demonstrate causation to students, as opposed to adopting a thematic approach, which does not treat time in a linear fashion and often leaves students struggling to understand how one event connects to, and sometimes causes, another. We are mindful, too, that Canada’s history was often messy and certainly never as neat as it might appear in the pages of these books.

It is our hope that this history of Canada will help readers to see their own country more clearly, to gain greater understanding of its complexity and its place in a wider world, and to appreciate the struggles of those in the past and present to achieve fairness and justice. We believe Canadians want a clear and compelling account to their country’s past. They want to understand its triumphs and setbacks, visionaries and villains, giants of industry and champions of social welfare and civic rights and freedoms. In that narrative it is instructive, for example, to reflect on how truly flawed some of our great Canadians have been. In the academic context, history is not an exercise for promoting pride in citizenship or glorifying some meta-narrative imposing false order on a diverse and complicated past. There are dark aspects of our history: too many people have been marginalized and persecuted, often on the basis of religion, race, or gender, and Canada remains a work in progress, a continuing project that began as a constitutional compromise in 1867.

Most of our readers will be Canadians, and one of our key goals is to enhance our readers’ understanding of the political traditions of their country. As citizens and voters, we have an obligation to be well informed. Canada’s history, as we demonstrate, was not without conflict, but, more often, has been a story of peaceful gradualism, and this history has yielded a nation founded upon compromise. “Unity” may sound like an admirable goal, but a successful nation must accommodate heterogeneity, disagreement, and conflicting visions, rather than seeking to stifle them.

We have traced the line between the many events of pre-contact, of colonial Canada, the formation of a nation, and the 150 years of struggling to build a successful society. Naturally, not all of the events and factors of Canada’s history conduced to this end, but they all created a context which shaped the nation that Canada became. The enormity of this intellectual task is evident. This is a long period of history in which many, many narratives unfolded, unrelated and guided by exigency and opportunity as opposed to any consistent concept of political or social structure. The breadth of this inquiry and the absence of formal markers for presenting the historical evidence require that these books look beyond economics and politics to show the interconnection between all aspects of society and the many connections among them. The problems of selection, description, causation, and relationship are immense.

The deep-seated problems in need of urgent redress do not undercut the fact that Canada’s story is fundamentally one of reasonable success when compared to many other nation-states that make up the international community—a point that is too often overlooked. Canada is one of the world’s most prosperous and welcoming countries, where the rule of law protects people and property and where citizens have access to a rich array of social programs. It is a beacon to many in the world with growing evidence of opportunity, diversity, and social inclusion. In 2015–16, it welcomed 25,000 Syrian refugees with much fanfare. Nearly 20 percent of Canada’s population was born outside the country. The dream of a diverse nation has a long history in Canada and can be traced at least to Robert Baldwin and Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine, and especially to George-Étienne Cartier, one of the really important proponents of Confederation, and others who insisted in 1867 that Canada had to embrace diversity. There is much still to be done, of course. We need only witness urban homelessness; First Nations reserves struggling with teen suicide, inadequate housing, and unsafe drinking water; regional inequities and alienation; gender discrimination and violence against women; and the lingering questions over religion and religious symbols in public spaces—all of which have their origins in Canada’s past—to realize the challenges of our own time.

The field of Canadian history has grown enormously in recent years and scholarly output has been immense. A brief survey of Canada’s history can never hope to cover all aspects of that past nor do justice to every approach taken by our colleagues. We continue to enjoy working in an environment of lively and varied, but civil and respectful, historical controversy. And we hope that some of the ideas raised in Conflict and Compromise will inspire students to explore further the wonderful work of Canada’s many historians.

Raymond B. Blake is Professor and Chair of the Department of History at the University of Regina.

Jeffrey A. Keshen is Dean of Arts at Mount Royal University.

Norman J. Knowles is Professor of History at St. Mary’s University in Calgary, Alberta.

Barbara J. Messamore is Associate Professor of History at the University of the Fraser Valley.