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Pride Month: Course Syllabi Featuring UTP Titles

Pride Month

To celebrate Pride Month, we have developed a blog series with weekly posts, designed to allow UTP authors the opportunity to share with us what Pride means to them, and to discuss a whole manner of Pride-related topics.

This week we’re showcasing UTP books that have made their way onto recent course syllabi. Read on to see how our books are used in undergraduate classroom across North America.


Prairie Fairies: A History of Queer Communities and People in Western Canada, 1930-1985

Prairie Fairies draws upon a wealth of oral, archival, and cultural histories to recover the experiences of queer urban and rural people in the prairies. Focusing on five major urban centres (Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Regina, Edmonton, and Calgary), Prairie Fairies explores the regional experiences and activism of queer men and women by looking at the community centres, newsletters, magazines, and organizations that they created from 1930 to 1985.

  • Winner of the CHA 2019 Clio Prairies Book Award
  • Winner of the Jennifer Welsh Scholarly Writing Award (Saskatchewan Book Awards)

 

Course

Canadian Women’s and Gender History (HI 397), Wilfrid Laurier University, Brantford, ON

Professor Tarah Brookfield lists Prairie Fairies as one out of three options for a book review assignment.

“This course explores the history of Canadian women from the colonial period until the end of the twentieth century. It compares women’s diverse historic experiences in the workplace, family, community, and nation, and how women’s and men’s identities and paths were shaped by social constructions of gender, race, sexuality, and class. The course also considers how historians have developed the field of women’s and gender history and how this has reshaped understandings of Canadian history.”


Queering Urban Justice: Queer of Colour Formations in Toronto

Queering Urban Justice foregrounds visions of urban justice that are critical of racial and colonial capitalism, and asks: What would it mean to map space in ways that address very real histories of displacement and erasure? What would it mean to regard Queer, Trans, Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour (QTBIPOC) as geographic subjects who model different ways of inhabiting and sharing space?

Course

Urban Politics (PO 412), John Carroll University, University Heights, OH

Professor Elizabeth A. Stiles recommends Queering Urban Justice to students in this course.

“Most Americans live in metropolitan areas—either in a city or in a suburb based in relation to a city. The city is often the background for the American dream as opportunities for social mobility and wealth are present there. It is also the site for some of our sharpest failures as a nation—rising inequality, urban riots, and environmental problems. In this course, we will begin with various theories and evidence about urban politics and their surrounding suburbs. We will then analyze links between urban institutions and national politics, as well as issues of race, class, health disparities, and environmental issues.”


Sex and the Weimar Republic: German Homosexual Emancipation and the Rise of the Nazis

Liberated, licentious, or merely liberal, the sexual freedoms of Germany’s Weimar Republic have become legendary. The home of the world’s first gay rights movement, the republic embodied a progressive, secular vision of sexual liberation. Sex and the Weimar Republic examines the rise of sexual tolerance through the debates which surrounded “immoral” sexuality: obscenity, male homosexuality, lesbianism, transgender identity, heterosexual promiscuity, and prostitution.

Course

Modern German History – The Weimar Years (HIST 196G), University of California, Santa Cruz, CA

Professor Edward Kehler teaches this course and each week students are asked to discuss a particular reading. In Week 7, students focus on Sex and the Weimar Republic.

“The class is designed as a small-group discussion course providing a broad overview of some of the major historiographical debates concerning the Weimar period. Through the readings we will analyze modern Germany’s experiment with democracy and its failure. Subjects of study will include the foundation and development of the Weimar Republic, the political and economic challenges it faced, and its ultimate collapse. Aspects of Weimar culture, including gender politics and homosexual emancipation, and the factors that enabled Adolf Hitler’s seizure of power will also be covered in depth.”


Consider adding these titles to your course syllabi:

VIVA M•A•C: AIDS, Fashion, and the Philanthropic Practices of M•A•C Cosmetics

The first cultural history of the iconic brand M·A·C Cosmetics, VIVA M·A·C charts the evolution of M·A·C’s revolutionary corporate philanthropy around HIV/AIDS awareness. Drawing upon exclusive interviews with M·A·C co-founder Frank Toskan, key journalists, and fashion insiders, Andrea Benoit tells the fascinating story of how M·A·C’s unique style of corporate social responsibility emerged from specific cultural practices, rather than being part of a strategic marketing plan.


Amplify: Graphic Narratives of Feminist Resistance

In this highly original text—a collaboration between a college professor, a playwright, and an artist—graphic storytelling offers an emotionally resonant way for readers to understand and engage with feminism and resistance.

“This is the book for you if you have ever struggled to reconcile the academic, artistic, and activist sides of yourself: it combines feminist analysis and history with compelling discussion questions and striking illustrations of recent political struggles. This is the book for you if you are ready to learn about social justice in a fresh way that engages multiple learning styles and modes of expression: lead a class or a discussion group by showing an image, posing a debate question, reading an excerpt, or pursuing one of the research activities provided. This is the rare book that treats its readers as equals by showing us all how we can join the conversation and take up the struggle.”

Lucas Crawford, Department of English, University of New Brunswick


Growing into Resilience: Sexual and Gender Minority Youth in Canada

Despite recent progress in civil rights for sexual and gender minorities (SGM), ensuring SGM youth experience fairness, justice, inclusion, safety, and security in their schools and communities remains an ongoing challenge. In Growing into Resilience, André P. Grace and Kristopher Wells investigate how teachers, healthcare workers, and other professionals can help SGM youth build the human and material assets that will empower them to be happy, healthy, and resilient.


Homophobia in the Hallways: Heterosexism and Transphobia in Canadian Catholic Schools

In Homophobia in the Hallways, Tonya D. Callaghan interrogates institutionalized homophobia and transphobia in the publicly-funded Catholic school systems of Ontario and Alberta. Featuring twenty interviews with students and teachers who have faced overt discrimination in Catholic schools, the book blends theoretical inquiry and real-world case study, making Callaghan’s study a unique insight into religiously-inspired heterosexism and genderism. She uncovers the causes and effects of the long-standing disconnect between Canadian Catholic schools and the Charter by comparing the treatment of and attitudes towards lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer teachers and students in these publicly-funded systems.


Pink Blood: Homophobic Violence in Canada

Pink Blood is the first book to analyze homophobic violence on a national scale. Douglas Victor Janoff uses social theory, legal analysis, descriptive case studies, and interviews with victims, activists, and police officers from thirty cities to convey the shattering impact this violence has had on queer Canadians and on the communities they inhabit.

Drawing from a wide range of scholarship—law, criminology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, and social work—Pink Blood is an important addition to the literature on queer life in Canada from a respected researcher and community activist.

April and May Round-up

Highlights from the month of April and May.

Awards:

Conferences:

  • Daniel Quinlan and Matt Buntin represented UTP at the International Studies Association’s annual conference in San Francisco.
  • Jodi Lewchuk showcased our Urban Studies list at the Urban Affair Association’s annual meeting. She also represented UTP at the Association of American Geographers annual conference in New Orleans.
  • Meg Patterson was in New York City for the American Educational Research Association’s annual conference.
  • Stephen Shapiro represented the press at the annual meeting of the Association for the Studies of Nationalities.
  • Anna Del Col, Natalie Fingerhut, and Suzanne Rancourt were in Kalamazoo, MI for the International Congress on Medieval Studies.
  • Jodi Lewchuk was in Los Angeles for the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association.\
  • Meg Patterson showcased our Health and Humanities list at the Indigenous Health Conference in Mississauga.
  • We showcased our latest social sciences and humanities titles at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Regina, SK.
  • Jane Kelly represented the press at Book Expo America in New York City.

Media Highlights:

 

New Releases:

Eating Culture: An Anthropological Guide to Food, Second Edition

Feast on this! We have just published a gorgeous new edition of Eating Culture: An Anthropological Guide to Food, with a full-colour interior and a range of new features for students and instructors. In this blog post, the author, Gillian Crowther, provides background on how the book has changed from the first to the second edition and on some of the important issues raised in its pages. We highly recommend this book not only as a textbook but as a fascinating introduction to thinking about food and culture in very different ways!

Over the last few years we have heard a lot about avocados; entertained the consumption of all things charcoal; experimented with chickpea pancakes and aquafaba; worried about palm oil, plastic packaging, weighed-up sugar taxes; warmed to the wonders of fermentation; watched hands-and-pans videos; and have learned (despite IKEA’s claim) that meatballs are actually Turkish! Each day brings a new food story, and the challenge for anyone teaching the anthropology of food is to provide an approach that can accommodate the dynamic nature of our collective food culture. The opportunity, then, to dish up another serving of Eating Culture: An Anthropological Guide to Food was enticing. It has allowed me to modify its recipe, mix in some new ingredients, and rearrange the existing core to improve the original textures and tastes, and to keep it relevant.

The book still incorporates an emphasis on listening to public food discourses to understand local food culture—the nutritional, culinary, gastronomic, and sustainable meanings and values surrounding avocados, charcoal, and meatballs, for instance. The basic structure remains the same, moving from our nutrient needs, global patterns of food acquisition, cooking, and commensality, towards contemporary social, economic, and political realities. Ethnographic examples continue to explore the similarities and differences of our relationships with food, to address varied cosmological ideas and the identity-work of gender, age, class, and ethnicity, while considering the dynamics of power and authority manifest in the control of food. The materiality of food, and our embodied experiences of cooking and eating, are also persistent themes extending into the new edition.

Each chapter, however, has been refined, and some substantially re-written, to more clearly address an anthropological framework for making sense of our global food system. More specifically, the discussion of the globalization of food production, distribution, and consumption has been reworked and updated. It now includes the work of the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization to explore how top-down global models intersect with grassroots food security, sovereignty, and activism. Consequently, the global gastro-anomie chapter is now organized around specific food challenges—famine, climate change, and non-communicable diseases—and the gastro-politics of varied solutions concerning quantity, quality, and access to food are assessed. These serious realities are balanced by recognition of the satisfaction and pleasure that are gained from food, its creative potential, and its eminently social capacities. Each chapter is accompanied by some suggested further readings drawn from the work of current food scholars, which can be useful as course supplements or student assignments.

The new edition remains structured around the conceptual frame of cuisine as a significant facet of everyday culture, deeply tied to personal and group identity, and memory-making. The book’s case studies, from Britain, Guatemala, France, India, and the United States, among other locales, serve to contextualize cuisines in the wider historical, social, economic, and political processes of everyday life. These model the questions food anthropologists pose and the sources of evidence studied, and serve as comparison points against which the reader’s own cuisine can be brought into focus. To facilitate a process of self-reflection, this edition includes new experiential learning assignments to accentuate the “guide” quality of the text. There are two types of practical exercises, which focus on specific foods and related fieldwork activities. These were designed to make classes interactive and to bring food into the room without the logistics of food safety! Each applies the frame of social anthropology to interrogate the values and meanings that shape everyday food activities, environmental and social relationships, and our sense of identity.

“Pondering a Foodstuff” boxes focus on particular foods, ranging from raw ingredients such as sugar, fat, and meat, to specific cooked dishes like pies and chocolates, for instance. These are served as tastes of the research possibilities that surround any food and illustrate how embedded food is in the social fabric of any cultural context. Toward this end, the book moves Malinowski’s “imponderabilia of actual life” into the twenty-first century, making methodological use of the Instagram-able quality of food and our fondness for smartphone photography. The photographs, now in full colour, model the anthropological lens, framing our everyday food encounters as worthy of study. These practical boxes encourage photographic scavenger hunts, which sharpen observational skills, and prompt anthropological questions based on each chapter’s terms and themes. While images cannot replace the materiality of food, they certainly cut down on classroom messiness and foster productive chat-‘n-chew teachable moments. For instance, the images can facilitate an interrogation of a food’s material substance, allowing its objective, sensorially assessed physical properties to be recalled and considered as cues for handling, processing, cooking, and eating. A picture can easily trigger sensory memories and start the conversation about how meanings and values are assigned to food, transforming its properties into sought after or avoided qualities. Furthermore, the range of food images, from fruit to meat, opens the door to debates about health and ethical choices, the pleasures of gastronomy and commensality, and grave sustainability issues surrounding global food patterns.

“Foodscape Grounded” boxes, on the other hand, provide specific, self-guided, out-and-about activities to bring another practical engagement with the book’s content. Included are an exploration of food labels, supermarket and farmer’s market fieldtrips, an assessment of food security using the four pillars approach, and a guide to restaurant reviews. These cultivate an awareness of the global food system’s reach, bringing home the global ramifications of our eating practices and directly tapping into students’ engagement with public food discourses as part of classroom discussions. Furthermore, the experiential activities are a powerful reminder of the important concept of embodiment, which is particularly relevant to the anthropology of food. For instance, cooking is an embodied skill, calling upon the cook to manipulate foods, to engage with its materiality, and to perform patterned tasks to make something to eat. The “Chaîne Opératoire” exercise asks for a step-by-step account of the bodily and cognitive skills and knowledge required to transform raw ingredients into a cooked dish. It makes apparent how culture is written into physical experiences, including the sensory engagement with food.

As a teaching tool, Eating Culture: An Anthropological Guide to Food dishes up an anthropological perspective that invites students to apply its ideas through testing, sampling, and discussion, and to formulate an understanding of their local food culture. It encourages students to regard their recent food experiences as valuable, meaningful, relevant, and worthy—the stuff of anthropological research. It also emphasizes that wherever anthropologists conduct fieldwork, we engage with the everyday lives of ordinary people—just like our students, and their ideas, behaviours, and experiences are what constitute culture, everywhere.

Gillian Crowther is Professor of Anthropology at Capilano University in Vancouver, British Columbia.

May Round-Up

Here is a recap of what went on at UTP in the month of May.

Conferences:

Richard Ratzlaff attended the Association for the Study of Nationalities 2017 Annual World Convention in New York from May 4th to May 6th.

Suzanne Rancourt, Natalie Fingerhut, and Anna Del Col had a great time as always at Kalamazoo (or, the International Congress on Medieval Studies) from May 11th to May 14th.

Finally, we were thrilled to be at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences again this year, from May 27th to June 2nd, and loved that it was in Toronto hosted by Ryerson University. It was great to see so many people interested in our books, and to see so many of our authors and future authors. We are looking forward to Regina next year!

Author Events:

On May 9th, a standing room only crowd gathered at Clinton St Public School for the launch of Making a Global City: How one Toronto School Embraced Diversity by Rob Vipond.  A more intimate, but no less enthusiastic crowd attended a book launch at The Munk Centre for Global Affairs on May 25th.

Awards:

We are thrilled to announce the following awards:

John Borrows’ Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism won the Donald Smiley Prize awarded by the Canadian Political Science Association.

Ronald Rudin’s Kouchibouguac: Removal, Resistance, and Remembrance at a Canadian National Park won both the Clio Atlantic Region Prize and the Canadian Oral History Association Prize, from the Canadian Historical Association.

Maureen Lux’s Separate Beds: A History of Indian Hospitals in Canada, 1920s-1980s won the Aboriginal History Book Prize awarded by the Canadian Historical Association.

Norman Hillmer’s O.D. Skelton: A Portrait of Canadian Ambition won the 2015 Stacey Prize awarded by the Canadian Commission for Military History and the Canadian Committee for the History of the Second World War.

George O. Liber’s Total Wars and the Making of Modern Ukraine, 1914-1954 co-won the Best Book in the fields of Ukrainian history, politics, language, literature, and culture awarded by the American Association for Ukrainian Studies and Maxim Tarnawsky’s The All-Encompassing Eye of Ukraine: Van Nechui-Levyts’kyi’s Realist Prose was an honourable mention in the same prize.

Maria Luisa Ardizzone’s Reading as the Angels Read: Speculation and Politics in Dante’s Banquet won the Medieval Book Prize awarded by the American Association for Italian Studies.

Amber Dean’s Remembering Vancouver’s Disappeared Women: Settler Colonialism and the Difficulty of Inheritance was a co-winner of the Women’s and Gender Studies Association Outstanding Scholarship Prize.

Jennifer Hubbard, David Wildish, and Robert Stephenson’s A Century of Maritime Science: The St. Andrews Biological Station won the John Lyman Book Award awarded by the North American Society for Oceanic History, in the “Naval and Maritime Science and Technology” category.

Karen Foster’s Productivity and Prosperity: A Historical Sociology of Productivist Thought was an honourable mention in the John Porter Prize awarded by the Canadian Sociological Association.

Congratulations to all!

In the Media:

Blacklocks Reporter reviewed Spying on Canadians: The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Security Service and the Origins of the Long Cold War by Gregory S. Kealey.

The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy by Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber was profiled by Frontiers in Psychology.

BizEd Magazine reviewed Rick Nason’s It’s not Complicated: The Art and Science of Complexity in Business.

MidWest Book Review declared Gentrifier by John Schlichtman, Jason Patch and Marc Lamont Hill to be a “must-read” and said it was “highly recommended.”  Schlichtman was interviewed about the book by NPR Wisconsin. 

Rob Vipond was interviewed about Making a Global City: How one Toronto School Embraced Diversity by Steve Paikin, host of TVOntario’s The Agenda.

Lions or Jellyfish: Newfoundland-Ottawa Relations Since 1957 by Raymond Blake was reviewed in a collection of key titles for Canada 150 by Margaret Conrad for Atlantic Books Today.

New Releases:

An Introduction to the Crusades by S.J. Allen

The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy by Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber (New in Paperback!)

Conflict and Compromise: Pre-Confederation Canada by Raymond B. Blake, Jeffrey Keshen, Norman J. Knowles, and Barbara J. Messamore

Conflict and Compromise: Post-Confederation Canada by Raymond B. Blake, Jeffrey Keshen, Norman J. Knowles, and Barbara J. Messamore

Latin American Politics: An Introduction, Second Edition by David Close

Asian Canadian Studies Reader edited by Roland Sintos Coloma and Gordon Pon

Edging Toward Iberia by Jean Dangler

Beau Monde on Empire’s Edge: State and Stage in Soviet Ukraine by Mayhill C. Fowler

Canada’s Department of External Affairs, Volume 3: Innovation and Adaptation, 1968–1984 by John Hilliker, Mary Halloran, and Greg Donaghy

Revitalizing Health for all: Case Studies of the Struggle for Comprehensive Primary Health Care edited by Ronald Labonté, David Sanders, Corinne Packer, and Nikki Schaay

Homelands and Empires: Indigenous Spaces, Imperial Fictions, and Competition for Territory in Northeastern North America, 1690–1763 by Jeffers Lennox

The Art of Subtraction: Digital Adaptation and the Object Image by Bruno Lessard

It’s not Complicated: The Art and Science of Complexity in Business by Rick Nason

Confessional Cinema: Religion, Film, and Modernity in Spain’s Development Years, 1960–1975 by Jorge Pérez

Josep Pla: Seeing the World in the Form of Articles by Joan Ramon Resina

A Nobel Affair: The Correspondence Between Alfred Nobel and Sofie Hess edited and translated by Erika Rummel

Victimology: A Canadian Perspective by Jo-Anne M. Wemmers

Value Change in the Supreme Court of Canada by Matthew E. Wetstein and C.L. Ostberg

The Near Abroad: Socialist Eastern Europe and Soviet Patriotism in Ukraine, 1956-1985 by Zbigniew Wojnowski

April Round-Up

Here is a recap of what went on at UTP in the month of April.

Conferences:

We had a busy month with conferences, especially our acquisitions editor Doug Hildebrand who attended 3 conferences in 4 weeks!

  • Doug Hildebrand and Stephen Shapiro represented UTP at the Association of American Geographers meeting in Boston from April 5th-9th.
  • The Medieval Academy of America conference was in Toronto this year (right down the street from our downtown office, in fact) and Suzanne Rancourt and Natalie Fingerhut displayed our medieval titles there from April 6th-8th.
  • Doug Hildebrand was at the Urban Affairs Association meeting from April 19th-22nd in Minneapolis.
  • And finally, Doug also attended the American Education Research Association meeting in San Antonio from April 27th-May 1st, where we were happy to debut the brand new paperback edition of The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy.

Awards:

April was also a great month for awards! Congratulations to all of our recipients.

In the Media:

 

New Releases: