UTP Blog

Advancing Knowledge

Literary Studies

“Mosaic Fictions: Writing Identity in the Spanish Civil War” and Picturing Canadians

We invited Emily Robins Sharpe, author of Mosaic Fictions: Writing Identity in the Spanish Civil War, to discuss her book which examines Canadian Spanish Civil War literature and reveals texts composed between the war’s outbreak and the present to illuminate the integral connections between Canada’s developing national identity and global leftist action.

Researching “The Typewriter Century”

As a vehicle for outstanding creativity, the typewriter has been taken for granted and was, until now, a blind spot in the history of writing practices. The Typewriter Century: A Cultural History of Writing Practices provides a cultural history of the typewriter and explores “celebrity writers,” including Henry James, Jack Kerouac, Agatha Christie, Georges Simenon, and Erle Stanley Gardner. In this post, author Martyn Lyons shares what a day in the life of a researcher looks like as he discusses some of the meticulous archival research that went into his book.

The New Spice Box: A Sparkling Collection of Contemporary Jewish Writing

The New Spice Box: Contemporary Jewish Writing, now in its third iteration, is the latest book to be released by New Jewish Press and brings together contemporary short stories, creative non-fiction, and poetry by a mix of authors offering a window into new and exciting Jewish writing. In this post, we asked author Ruth Panofsky to talk us through her book which celebrates recent Jewish writing.

Order and Disorder: England’s Troubled History

Award-winning teacher Ken MacMillan is the author of the recently published Death and Disorder: A History of Early Modern England, 1485–1690. The book introduces readers to the tumultuous world of Tudor and Stuart England, where numerous kings and queens were killed, their advisors assassinated, treasonous nobles beheaded, religious heretics burned at the stake, and common criminals executed by hanging. In this post, MacMillan delves deeper into some of these stories and discusses what we can expect from the book.

Behind the Book: Exploring Illustrated Children’s Literature under Lenin and Stalin

Released this summer, Picturing the Page: Illustrated Children’s Literature and Reading under Lenin and Stalin offers a vivid exploration of illustrated children’s literature and reading under Lenin and Stalin – a period when mass publishing for children and universal public education became available for the first time in Russia. In this post, author Megan Swift talks about how her book came to life and explores the vital and multifaceted function illustrated children’s literature plays in repurposing the past.