UTP Blog

Advancing Knowledge

Political Science

How Activists Put a Human Face on Climate Change

Climate change was once understood as solely an environmental issue. Now a growing class of activists claim climate change to be a gender, equity, labour, Indigenous rights, faith, and health issue. In this post, Jen Iris Allan, author of The New Climate Activism explores why and how these activists brought their issues to climate change, and why some succeeded while others did not.

The Hill Times’ List of 100 Best Books in 2020: “Canadian Political Economy”

Making The Hill Times’ List of 100 Best Books in 2020, Canadian Political Economy brings together experts from a number of disciplinary backgrounds to explore Canada’s empirical political economy and the field’s contributions to theory and debate. In this post, lead editor Heather Whiteside brings us up-to-date with the political economy in the Canadian context, and discusses what we can expect from the book.

Essential Books for Introduction to Political Science Courses

With classes back in session, we wanted to highlight a few of the newest texts available for courses in Introduction to Political Science and Canadian Politics, as well as mention a few forthcoming titles that we’re most excited about dropping later this spring.

Twenty Years of Digital Politics in Canada

Ideal for a wide-ranging course on the impact of digital technology on the Canadian political system, newly released Digital Politics in Canada: Promises and Realities encourages students to critically engage in discussions about the future of Canadian politics and democracy. In this post, editors Tamara A. Small and Harold J. Jansen discuss their love of digital politics and examine some of the changes that have taken place in Canadian politics over the last twenty years. 

What’s Missing in the New Federal Climate-Change Plan?

Why has Canada been unable to achieve any of its climate change targets? This is the question Douglas Macdonald’s book, Carbon Province, Hydro Province, seeks to answer. Macdonald explains that the ultimate reason for Canadian failure lies in the differing energy interests of the western and eastern provinces. The book was released back in March, and a lot has happened in the world since then, including the Throne Speech from the Canadian government in late September. So we asked Douglas Macdonald to examine what impact the speech might have on Canada’s climate and energy policies going forward.