UTP Blog

Advancing Knowledge

Sociology

How Activists Put a Human Face on Climate Change

Climate change was once understood as solely an environmental issue. Now a growing class of activists claim climate change to be a gender, equity, labour, Indigenous rights, faith, and health issue. In this post, Jen Iris Allan, author of The New Climate Activism explores why and how these activists brought their issues to climate change, and why some succeeded while others did not.

Adaptation, Enchantment, and Solidarity in a “Winter” City – An Excerpt from Seasonal Sociology

Back in Fall, we shared an excerpt from Seasonal Sociology on the Pumpkin Spice Latte, a drink which has become, for many, a seasonal ritual. Thinking about the seasons sociologically opens up a unique perspective for studying and understanding social life. So as temperatures plummet this week across Canada, we thought we would share another excerpt from the book, this time from Chapter 7, which focuses on the city of Edmonton, Alberta, and their efforts to embrace and celebrate winter.

Sex Industry Slavery: Protecting Canada’s Youth

Sexual exploitation and human sex trafficking is a multi-billion-dollar international industry that preys on youth. Sex Industry Slavery: Protecting Canada’s Youth, written by veteran police officer Robert Chrismas, is an impactful read for anyone who wants to know more about this serious Canadian problem. In this post, Chrismas dives deeper into his book and discusses why he wanted to protect vulnerable people from a young age.

The Pumpkin Spice Latte: An Excerpt from Seasonal Sociology

Seasonal Sociology is a brand-new textbook that offers an engrossing and lively introduction to sociology through the seasons. Thinking about the seasons sociologically opens up a unique perspective for studying and understanding social life. With fall now in full swing, we thought we’d share an excerpt from the book. So grab yourself a pumpkin spice latte and learn about the pumpkin spice latte. Why has this drink become such a seasonal tradition for so many people?