UTP Blog

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Canada

One Weird Trick to Avoid a Complete Financial Meltdown

Providing insights into the evolution of the global political economy, From Malaise to Meltdown: The International Origins of Financial Folly, 1844– identifies the main instigators behind the global financial crises we’ve seen in the last two hundred years. In this post, author Michael Lee details some of these cases and looks at what lessons we can learn from them. 

The Urgent Need to Address Physical Inactivity

Today is International Day of Sport for Development and Peace, an occasion marked every year to promote healthy lifestyles and when some of the world’s leading sportspeople work together with communities to bring sporting opportunities to enrich lives, particularly children. So we reached out to Bruce Kidd, former Olympic athlete and a member of Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame. His latest book, A Runner’s Journey, comes out later this year from Aevo-UTP. In this post, Kidd looks at how we can all come together to revitalize physical education, physical activity, and community sport in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

From Exclusivity to Inclusivity: Making Archaeology an Equitable Profession

Now in its third edition, Introducing Archaeology continues to be a thoughtful and engaging textbook for introductory-level students. In this post, co-author Stacey L. Camp talks us through some of the updates to the third edition and shares an excerpt from chapter five of the book on inclusivity within archaeology.

“Seen but Not Seen”

Donald B. Smith, professor emeritus of history at the University of Calgary, is one of Canada’s most renowned historians, having written extensively on Aboriginal Canada, Quebec, and the history of Calgary and Southern Alberta. His final book to be published in a distinguished career, Seen but Not Seen explores the history of Indigenous marginalization and why non-Indigenous Canadians failed to recognize Indigenous societies and cultures as worthy of respect. In this post, Smith discusses what we can expect from his final book which covers fresh ground in the history of settler-Indigenous relations.

Adaptation, Enchantment, and Solidarity in a “Winter” City – An Excerpt from Seasonal Sociology

Back in Fall, we shared an excerpt from Seasonal Sociology on the Pumpkin Spice Latte, a drink which has become, for many, a seasonal ritual. Thinking about the seasons sociologically opens up a unique perspective for studying and understanding social life. So as temperatures plummet this week across Canada, we thought we would share another excerpt from the book, this time from Chapter 7, which focuses on the city of Edmonton, Alberta, and their efforts to embrace and celebrate winter.