UTP Blog

Advancing Knowledge

higher education

Re-Envisioning Cell Theory (Part 2)

Now available for courses, From Cells to Organisms delves into the nature of scientific practice, showing that results are interpreted not only through the lens of a microscope, but also through the lens of particular ideas and prior philosophical convictions. In this three-part blog series, author Sherrie L. Lyons will discuss her book and delve deeper into the history of cell theory. In part two, Lyons looks at the current pandemic and explains why the majority of viruses and microbes are not only not harmful, they are essential to our health.

Environmental Politics in an Ever-Changing Political Context

With classes resuming in September, we thought it would be a good time to reach out to Andrea Olive, author of The Canadian Environment in Political Context. The second edition of her textbook was released last fall and in this post, we asked Andrea about the changes that have taken place in Canadian environmental politics since the release of the first edition back in 2015.

From the Editors: American Sociological Association 2020

This weekend, we were due to be in San Francisco, California, to attend the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Unfortunately, like many things this year, the meeting was cancelled, meaning we won’t get the chance to meet with everyone and showcase our latest books. Our acquisitions editors Jodi Lewchuk, Carli Hansen, and Meg Patterson wanted to send a message to those who would have been in attendance at ASA and share how you can contact them to discuss potential projects.

Re-Envisioning Cell Theory (Part 1)

Now available for courses, From Cells to Organisms delves into the nature of scientific practice, showing that results are interpreted not only through the lens of a microscope, but also through the lens of particular ideas and prior philosophical convictions. In a new three-part blog series, author Sherrie L. Lyons will discuss her book and delve into the history of cell theory. In part one, she examines the question: “What makes something alive?”

Having the Difficult Discussions about Race and Ethnicity in the Classroom

In a new post, Laura Tubelle de González, author of Through the Lens of Cultural Anthropology, discusses the conversations that are now taking place in academia to support the Black Lives Matter movement. In conjunction, we have made available a free chapter from her cultural anthropology textbook on Race and Ethnicity which we hope will bring a wider audience to the material and continue the much-needed conversations on the matter.